<html>
  <head>
    <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8">
  </head>
  <body text="#000000" bgcolor="#FFFFFF">
    <div class="moz-cite-prefix">On 7/23/2018 3:14 PM, qurgh lungqIj
      wrote:<br>
    </div>
    <blockquote type="cite"
cite="mid:CALPi+eRPkh-XJjp++aL+dszxkeCs1GZnZyeRxHvq5uhn0TzgvA@mail.gmail.com">On
      Mon, Jul 23, 2018 at 3:07 PM, mayqel qunenoS <span dir="ltr"><<a
          href="mailto:mihkoun@gmail.com" target="_blank"
          moz-do-not-send="true">mihkoun@gmail.com</a>></span> wrote:<br>
      <blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px
        0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex">
        <div>
          <div id="gmail-m_-5667618240674840531d_1532372853824">
            <p dir="ltr" style="margin-top:0px;margin-bottom:0px">There
              is something I don't understand with regards to the
              additional definition of "whereas" which was given to the
              {'ach}.</p>
            <br>
            <p dir="ltr" style="margin-top:0px;margin-bottom:0px">How is
              it possible to write a sentence, where the reader will
              understand only the "whereas", instead of the other
              meanings of {'ach} ?</p>
            <br>
            <p dir="ltr" style="margin-top:0px;margin-bottom:0px">~
              nI'ghma</p>
          </div>
        </div>
      </blockquote>
      <div><br>
      </div>
      <div>Use the idiom that came with it. I'd say something like:<br>
        <br>
        {Ha'DIbaH neH Sop loDnal 'ach,¬†ro' mojchugh ghIt, naH neH Sop
        be'nalDaj}<br>
        "The husband eats only meat, whereas his wife eats only
        vegetables"</div>
      <div><br>
      </div>
      <div>{mIp¬†ghowron 'ej ngeD yInDaj 'ach, ro' mojchugh ghIt, mIpHa'
        torgh 'ej Qatlhqu' yInDaj}<br>
        "Gowron is rich and his life is easy, whereas Torg is poor and
        his life is very difficult"</div>
    </blockquote>
    <p>But is <i>whereas</i> simply a synonym for <i>but,</i> or is
      there some subtle difference? The idiomatic expression appears to
      be an alternative to using <b>'ach</b> as <i>whereas,</i> but it
      is not made clear what the difference between <i>but</i> and <i>whereas</i>
      is supposed to be.</p>
    <p>Dictionary.com defines this kind of <i>but</i> as "on the
      contrary," and <i>whereas </i>as "while on the contrary." Not
      much difference there.</p>
    <p>It looks like Okrand is using <i>whereas</i> to contrast two
      approximately equal alternatives, and that this is somehow
      different from ordinary <i>but.</i> If this is the case, then <b>'ach</b>
      meaning both of them means Klingon doesn't distinguish this
      meaning except with the idiomatic expression.<br>
    </p>
    <pre class="moz-signature" cols="72">-- 
SuStel
<a class="moz-txt-link-freetext" href="http://trimboli.name">http://trimboli.name</a></pre>
  </body>
</html>