[tlhIngan Hol] heritage - legacy difference

Tad Stauffer tadbot at gmail.com
Mon Aug 26 09:27:35 PDT 2019


I noticed a pun/etymology/mnemonic for {'ISyar}. ”Legacy" is the Star Trek:
The Next Generation episode that features Tasha Yar's sister, ISHara YAR.

-Tad
sent from my smartphone telephone

On Mon, Aug 26, 2019, 11:28 AM Steven Boozer <sboozer at uchicago.edu> wrote:

> Since {‘ISyar} ‘legacy” is so new we don’t have any examples of it yet.
> But we do have an example of
>
> {quH} “heritage”:
>
>
>
>   tuQtaHvIS Hem.  ghaHvaD quHDaj qawmoH.
>
>   He wears it [his sash] proudly as a reminder of his heritage. S20
>
>
>
> Also, don’t forget {lurDech} “tradition”:
>
>
>
>   qorDu' lurDechmeyna' pab tlhInganpu'
>   With strong [Klingon] family traditions... S13
>
>   nughraj Dun lurDechmeyraj Dun je DIvuvta' 'e' lutul HaDwI'pu' 'ej vItul
> jIH.
>   The editors and I hope to have respected your rich culture and tradition
>      (Vincent Van Gerven Oei's speech at qepHom wa'maHDIch)
>
> Sometimes it’s useful to see how Okrand uses the English terms:
>
>
>
> (KGT 133):  Klingons revere their ancestors, respect their elders, and
> have unparalleled veneration for heritage.
>
> (KGT 62 ill.):  Honoring his heritage, a member of the House of Mogh
> proudly displays its insignia.
>
> (KGT 133):  Younger Klingons, while accepting their heritage and observing
> the ancient rites, see some aspects of their elders' behavior and beliefs
> as, if not obsolete, then just old-fashioned.
>
> (KGT 123):  The sash represents a Klingon's heritage. If the sash is
> removed, so is the Klingon's ancestral identity, and, along with it, his or
> her dignity and self-esteem.
>
> (KGT 36):  Klingon society is a stratified one. That is, there are clear
> distinctions between those with great wealth and influence and those with
> little or none. This sort of status is a matter of inheritance.
>
> (KGT 35f):  It should be pointed out that the vocabulary associated with
> rituals, martial arts, literature, opera, and the like, though some of it
> may be genuinely archaic, is not considered {mu'mey Doy'} (tired words).
> Traditions are extremely important in Klingon culture, and the younger
> generation honors them fully.
>
>
> (KGT 41):  The upper classes, for their part, incorporate a few archaic
> words into their speech. This is true among all age groups in the upper
> classes. It may be considered a sign of erudition and respect for
> tradition; it does not represent an aversion to change.
>
> (TKD 48, on –Ha'):  It was felt best not to argue with Klingon tradition.
>
> (KCD on the Sword of Kahless):  the most revered item in Klingon
> tradition.
>
> (KGT 59-60):  According to Klingon tradition, the first bat'leth was
> forged by Kahless the Unforgettable … Because of the importance of the
> bat'leth in Klingon tradition, however, they have taken to calling the
> bat'leth {betleH quv}…
>
> … and (occasionally) the Klingon-related episodes are helpful:
>
>
>
>  "Worf told Jeremy, whose mother had been killed, 'In my tradition, we do
> not grieve the loss of the body. We celebrate the releasing of the
> spirit’." (TKW 145; cf. TNG "The Bonding")
>
>
>
>   "The Klingon Empire has maintained a dueling tradition; they think they
> can beat us with swords." (Kirk, TOS "Day of the Dove")
>
>   "We don't practice Klingon tradition." (Wesley Crusher, TNG "The Icarus
> Factor")
>
>   "Kahless left us, all of us, a powerful legacy. A way of thinking and
> acting that makes us Klingon. If his words hold wisdom and his philosophy
> is honorable, what does it matter if he returns? What is important is that
> we follow his teachings. Perhaps the words are more important than the
> man." (Kahless II to Worf, TNG "Rightful Heir)
>
>
>
> As nIqolay mentioned, there is a certain degree of overlap.  That’s to be
> expected… in all natural languages.  Okrand’s goal was to create a natural
> sounding artificial language, not a perfectly logical and unambiguous one.
>  Klingon isn’t Vulcan.
>
>
>
> Until we get more information I imagine {‘ISyar} refers to something
> tangible; something one could physically inherit and pass down from
> generation to generation.  IOW something that would be mentioned in your
> parent’s last will and testament (e.g. personal belongings, weapons, lands
> and other property).
>
>
>
> --
> Voragh
>
>
>
>
> ___________________________________________________________________________________
>
>
>
> *On Behalf Of *nIqolay Q
>
> On Mon, Aug 26, 2019 at 10:14 AM mayqel qunen'oS <mihkoun at gmail.com>
> wrote:
>
> Although I m-w'd "heritage" and "legacy", I still can't understand the
> difference between them.
>
> If my father dies and leaves me a house, is this house my {quH} or my
> {'ISyar} ?
>
> The earth which will be inherited by the poor, is a {quH} or a {'ISyar} ?
>
> The culture of ancient rome, for the italians of today, is their {quH} or
> their {'ISyar} ?
>
>
>
> The English words have some overlap. My feeling is that "heritage"/{quH}
> focuses more on the descendant receiving something passed down, while
> "legacy"/{'ISyar} focuses more on the ancestor passing something down to
> their descendants. So in your first example, with the house being passed
> down from your father, I would say the house is {quHlIj} and {vavlI'
> 'ISyar}.
>
>
>
>
>
>
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