[tlhIngan Hol] spaces in nouns

Steven Boozer sboozer at uchicago.edu
Thu Aug 30 08:04:01 PDT 2018


Since Lieven is collecting examples, I found these which may or may not be useful:

 (KGT 113, WRT {mevyap}):  This expression, usually considered a single word, is used as a command meaning "Stop! Cease!" It comes from two Klingon verbs, {mev} (stop, cease) and {yap} (be enough, be sufficient). No doubt in the past, the locution was longer, perhaps {yImev, yap!} (Stop! It is enough!) ... {yap} (be enough) is used as if an exclamation or a single-word sentence meaning It is enough. The two words have been used in juxtaposition ({mev, yap}) for so long, they have come to be accepted as a single, though grammatically peculiar, word. If the order of the components were reversed ({yapmev}), the utterance would be meaningless.


(st.klingon 5/05/1998):  The Klingon word for "spoon" is {baghneQ}. Even though spoons were never typically used when eating, the word appears to have been in the language for a long time, suggesting that it may once have meant something else. One theory is that it comes from {nagh beQ} "flat stone, flat rock" and that the initial sounds of the two words, n and b, were, for some reason, transposed. This is, however, just speculation.

[BTW This transposition is known in English as a "spoonerism"! <g>]


HoS Hal  power supply (S14) vs. {HoSHal}  energy source (MKE)


{peQ chem}  magnetic field (two words) vs. {HoSchem} energy field, {pIvchem} warp field, {Surchem} force field.


You'll also want to consider numbers:  e.g. {cha'vatlh} vs. {cha' vatlh} :

  HIvtaHvIS toQDuj cha'vatlh wejmaH Soch vI' vagh chorgh 'uj 'ab 'oH 
  Attack Formation Height: 82.75 M. KBoP

  cha'vatlh QaS yItlhap 
  Gain 200 forces. MKE

  cha'vatlh ben HIq vItlhutlh 
  I will drink Two Century Old Ale. PK (maybe it's two words here? Cf. next example)

  cha' vatlh ben HIq 
  Two Century Old Wine (st.k 12/12/96; two words!)

  cha' vatlh ben 
  200 years ago. (IMO, HQ 8.3:3; two words!)

  cha' vatlh DIS poH 
  two centuries. (IMO, HQ 8.3:3)

  cha' vatlh DIS ret 
  two centuries ago. (IMO, HQ 8.3:3)

--
Voragh


-----------------------------------Original Message-----------------------------------
From: Felix Malmenbeck

> I do remember though that in some of his messages, he explicetely 
> stated when a word needs a space or not. I'd like to collect those, so 
> I wondered if anyone else has ever asked and received an answer for a 
> word needing a space?

One that comes to mind is <wabDo> ("Mach") and <wab Do> ("speed of sound") from qepHom'a' 2016 (first used in the Smithsonian thing).

"As a spelling convention, {wab Do} "speed of sound" is written as two words. When used as a measurement term ("Mach"), it's written as one word (wabDo). The pronunciation (and, for that matter, meaning) is the same."

________________________________________________________________________________
From: Lieven L. Litaer <levinius at gmx.de>

This topic is returning very often, and Okrand seems to be "not at all picky about that." (email to the mailing list from loghaD, 11/16/14)

I do remember though that in some of his messages, he explicetely stated when a word needs a space or not. I'd like to collect those, so I wondered if anyone else has ever asked and received an answer for a word needing a space?



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